21
Jan
12

Gifted and Learning Disabled?

Asymmetric Intelligence (note the scores above are derived from an older version of the Wechsler scales, It is displayed here to simplify the issues discussed in this posting. Later versions of the Wechsler scales, which I will address in subsequent posts, include "Index" scores that needlessly complicate the explication of the central issue in this posting: The differences between Verbal and Non-verbal Intelligence measures.

This set of IQ scores, including subtest scores, was obtained by a young man in his teens. He was angry, depressed , very sophisticated and confused. And he was brilliant and mediocre at the same time.

You should look at the difference between his  Verbal Score and his Performance Score. The former, Verbal, was of a magnitude shared by LESS  than FIVE in every THOUSAND kids his age; he was clearly gifted verbally.  His score far exceeded the mean even in his fast-paced private school setting, where the “average” was the 90th percentile. Even in this competitive milieu, he distinguished himself. His ideas were abstract, insightful, far beyond his years. He effortlessly generated fluent, grammatically complex and stunningly insightful comments and test responses, embedding in them vocabulary items both precise and scholarly. He read voraciously, debated issues with his teachers and refused to agree with things just because some authority said so. He loved TRUTH. He was respected, even awed by some of his teachers; he intimidated some with his astute reasoning and flawless logic.

But he was getting poor grades. He hated Science and Math. His writing was a scribbled tangle of lines and curves. He said he hated to write. His parents complained that he was disorganized, lazy, argumentative . But they loved him. “He’s a sweet boy,” his mother said. His father often discussed…and argued about…politics, the economy and especially morality, right and wrong. “He just seems frustrated all the time,” his father observed, just a hint of sadness in his voice. “He seems confused.”

Eric had good reason to be confused ! Look at his Performance score. About 50 of every 100 kids his age would score lower. BUT 50 would score higher. And so, in his high-powered, academically rigorous independent-school classrooms, he was well BELOW the average for that population. So, mathematical concepts like “square root” or “acute angle” didn’t make much sense to him. He could memorize formulas and procedures. But he couldn’t apply what he was learning. He couldn’t reason well at all when such concepts were involved.

When I asked him how far it was from New York to Los Angeles, he said “About 30,000 miles.” When I asked him to show me how big a “foot” was by holding his hands apart, the space he produced between hands was a good three feet. On an outline map of the U.S., he drew the Mississippi River horizontally from Texas to California. He “lost” things, he said. “I can never remember where I put something.” And though he was close to getting his driver’s license, his parents worried because he got lost so easily and couldn’t read maps at all.

Because what the Performance subtests measure, the ones called  Block Design, Object Assembly , Coding, etc .(see above), is NON-VERBAL abilities.  Notions of abstract space, proportion, orientation, direction, even time participate in these Performance functions. And so, when weaknesses and deficits occur in them, concepts like “The day after tomorrow” or “bilateral symmetry” or “atomic shells’ , even  left-right , the order of months in the year, ratios and congruency become nearly impenetrable mysteries because they cannot be “pictured”, because the word and terms connect with NOTHING or only the most nebulous of mental representations. Handwriting is sloppy, planning efforts are perfunctory and athletic competition is minimized.

Eric could, I guess, be called gifted-learning disabled. He was rare, rarer than many a gifted child, but common enough for me to have seen quite a few over the years. In later posts I’ll discuss what becomes of such individuals, what can be done to support them, what they can do themselves.

I explained a lot of this to Eric in a conference after testing. His parents asked me to. He had a thousand questions. He smiled a lot.

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